On Murakami’s Books

A good friend, C, recommended the books of Haruki Murakami last Saturday….(actually,not really “recommended,” but he sneered when I said I haven’t read any of his books yet.) Knowing him, and our inclination to certain genre of literature, I trust his taste. So I did my research, Murakami’s works have recurring themes of alienation, loneliness and depression. Novels with disappointing, or frustrating ends.

That intrigued me though.

Anyway, I came across ThoughCatalog’s review and others as well. They love the books through its pain, frustration and negative feelings but all of them implied his books are not meant to be read more than once. Eventually, we have to outgrow them.

“It touches the continuous struggle of people against loneliness.”

Continue reading “On Murakami’s Books”

We Set Sail.

Nights with eyes drowned by tears but with one deep breath, and an ear to listen…everything was all right.

There are times, it’s better to believe friends instead of what my mind creates. I felt cold and hateful as I allow distrust and paranoia to envelope my thoughts. Losing myself….losing my life.

I have to Accept the inevitability of change, and sail towards the uncertain future. Otherwise, I’ll drown hoping to relive the past, gasping for air as the waves of regret hits me and currents of attachment pulling me down.

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Stats

More than 7 Billion on Earth
More than 100 Million in PH
More than 1 Million in the City
More than 10,000 at my workplace
More than 1,000 co-employees
More than 500 colleages
More than 100 relatives
More than 50 acquaintances
More than 30 Friends
More than 20 crushes
Less than 15 close friends
7 cousins
3 grannies
2 parents
1 ex
1 best friend
0 sister
0 brother

I actually forgot the reason for this list. Perhaps, absorbed by counting with what I have or I just got lost…

Yes, lost.

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Jouska Quintus

Jouska – n. a hypothetical conversation that you compulsively play out in your head—a crisp analysis, a cathartic dialogue, a devastating comeback—which serves as a kind of psychological batting cage where you can connect more deeply with people than in the small ball of everyday life, which is a frustratingly cautious game of change-up pitches, sacrifice bunts, and intentional walks.

A: “The people who were there at my worst deserve me at my best.”

B: “They were not even there when you were at your worse.”

A: “So were you.”